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What are these weeds?

  • What are these weeds?
  • What are these weeds?
  • What are these weeds?
  • What are these weeds?

... and are they better to be treated with weedkiller or pulled up by the roots -but I'm finding them to be really tough customers, I could only wrench out the ones here as small!

Comments (13)

  1. Grower

    Miss Paula

    The first and last pictures show the weeds that are trying to engulf my newly planted apple tree and ill be worried to spray weedkiller near it however these weeds just won't come out by hand and have gone crazy! and they've covered half my garden in a few weeks.Also I have an abundance of wild geraniums in-between my periwinkle -again growing madly and easy to pull but smells terrible.

  2. Grower

    Rachel the Gardener

    The first and last are Dock: they have a very long taproot so it's not surprising that you can't pull them out easily!

    The middle two are Sedge - probably Carex gigantia, it's very common - and you should pull them out as soon as you see them, before they get big enough to be a problem: they are easy enough to get out while they are small like this.

    As for the Dock, I would suggest you cut them down to ground level (use secateurs and snip each one off as low as you can) then in about 3 weeks when they are producing a small tuft of new leaves, spritz them gently with glyphosate-based weedkiller, making sure not to squirt any valuable plants nearby! Cutting them down now prevents them from flowering and setting seed, which would just make the problem a hundred times worse: it means you can see where they are and can get to them more easily, and by forcing them to produce a new batch of leaves, they will be working hard: so when you spritz the tender new leaves, the weedkiller will be absorbed very quickly, and will therefore kill them more successfully than if you sprayed the mature plant.

    Hope this helps!

  3. Grower

    Miss Paula

    wow thats great advice and ill do that asap! thank you

  4. Grower

    Miss Paula

    Would salt kill the dock down to the tap root ?

  5. Grower

    Rachel the Gardener

    If using salt, do be very careful: use the minimum (same as for weedkiller!) and bear in mind that glyphosate is rendered inactive once it meets soil, ie it doesn't linger in the soil after killing the plant(s). Salt, on the other hand, will ruin the fertility of the soil for some considerable time - remember the bible? They used to "sow the land with salt" to ensure that crops would fail and the enemies would starve. So I wouldn't recommend using salt on any weeds that are either around your fruit trees, or in beds/borders in which you then want to grow other plants.

    Using salt would just about be acceptable to get weeds growing in the cracks in patios, though!

  6. Grower

    Miss Paula

    well in that case -I can use it in my front garden instead as its crazy paving and a constant weed battle ! thanks

  7. Grower

    Rachel the Gardener

    Oh! The Comment suggesting the use of salt on the cut stem of the plant, has been deleted!

    Never mind, Miss Paula, at least you now have a couple of suggestions to help you get weed-free, front and back!

  8. Grower

    Sheila Mitchell

    It's a very pretty grass but oh so invasive, I bought one at a car boot sale about 20 years ago I am still trying to get rid of it lol

  9. Grower

    Rachel the Gardener

    Hi Sheila, do you mean the Carex? I don't think I can agree with it being "pretty" (laughs) as I find it quite coarse: and I'm not surprised to hear that you still have them after 20 years, as they set masses of seed!

    The trick seems to be to weed them out when they are still tiny, as in Miss Paula's photos: when this small, they are easy to get out. When they get to knee height, it's more of a struggle: and by the time they are waist-high, they are really hard work to dig out!

  10. Grower

    Sheila Mitchell

    I don't think it's a Carex, though I don't know the name of it , it has long straplike quite wide leaves & long wands for stems with an elongated bulbous top, if it catches your bare skin can give you nasty weals. I find it forms big clums rapidly at this time of year

  11. Grower

    Rachel the Gardener

    Hi Sheila: sorry, my mistake, I thought you meant that you had the same "grass" that Miss Paula has - and that's definitely a Carex (Sedge). You can tell because the leaves and the flowering stems are triangular in cross section - cut one across, with secateurs or sharp scissors, and you can see what shape it is. This gives the leaves a very sharp crease, and a very obvious pointy "rib" along the underside of the leaf.

    Perhaps you could start a new Post, with photos of it?

  12. Grower

    Sheila Mitchell

    LOL it looked like the4 grass I have ooooops lol old age & poverty dulling the brain lol

  13. Grower

    Miss Paula

    Im poised for the next dry spell with a 5 litre Weedol Tough kill -battery operated sprayer.... worried for my 8 mth old cat and the plants I want to keep but the weeds are so winning right now ...


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