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My latest garden project - a wildlife pond

  • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
  • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond

I started this project back in autumn time but work came to a halt due to an injury I suffered at work. However, work recommenced in earnest in Springtime as soon as weather permitted. The pond was originally filled with tap water, left for a couple of weeks before adding oxygenators (native hornwort) with the remainder of the plants added over the last 3 or 4 weeks, as and when they became available.
I have tried to be mindful of adding many native species but could not resist a couple of non natives to grow in the pond. Namely a couple of dwarf waterlilies, Nymphaea laydekeri Fulgens and Pontederia cordata lanceolata, which I hope will thrive.

Already there are many beasties making themselves at home in and around the pond. The birds are loving it and I have found hedgehop poo in the area surrounding the beach end, so hopefully they too are enjoying their new water hole.

Comments (6)

  1. Grower

    Jeremy Wright

    You've inspired me Angie. It looks beautifully done. We haver an old dew pond surrounded by trees which is just waiting to be overhauled, but I know next to nothing about how to keep a pond. Trouble is water drains away completely in dry spells in summer. Are you using a plastic pond liner and planning to refill with a hose as the water evaporates in summer? Or are natural water supplies plentiful enough where you are!

  2. Grower

    Angie's Garden

    There is pletny info out there on ponds Jeremy, this site http://www.wildaboutgardens.org.uk/ has plenty of useful information.
    My liner is a flexible one which if used with the recommended underlay you get a 40 year guarantee. That will see me out! I've popped a few more pictures of work in progress.
    The hardest part was all the digging out. Whilst it has been totally satisfying in doing it all myself, had I had the budget I'd have maybe paid someone to help with the digging.
    Is your dew pond lined? If not that might be the way to go. I certainly don't envisage having a shortage of rain to fill the pond (without me collecting it) but I've read that there are many folks with ponds that dry out in the height of summer, some critter prefer that. The lack of rain here meant the pond dropped around 5 inches over a period of 7 weeks. I don't ever remember having a 7 week period without rain in my whole life up here!!! Our summers aren't even 7 weeks long!
    I was inspired to do this when I discovered froglets in the greenhouse last year.

    • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
    • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
    • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
    • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
  3. Grower

    Jeremy Wright

    Thanks Angie. The linked content is good and they are a great series of photos. Makes it look so quick and easy (which I am sure it wasn't). I'm most impressed you dug it all by hand.

    When we lived in Brighton I once decided to 'lower the lawn' to make it level. The garden was about 40ft long, 25ft wide and 2ft higher at one end than the other. As the garden was straight onto chalk and the topsoil was thin (essentially chalk downland) I had to dig deeper and replace all the topsoil. Then all the spoil had to be bagged up and carried down steps and through the house. It took me 10 months and I was certainly fitter by the end of it. But I now have big respect for people who take on digging projects!

  4. Grower

    Jim Edwards

    Here's my novel way to keep the pond topped up, note the extension to the roof gutter top right hand of photo. I have made an overflow at the rear of the pond by layering the liner into a shallow trench and then into a deeper trench filled with gravel as a soak away.
    Looking at Angie's glasshouse the same could be achieved from an associated water butt and overflow into the pond.

    • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
    • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
    • My latest garden project - a wildlife pond
  5. Grower

    Angie's Garden

    Your pond is lovely Jim. Nice that the surrounding plants are all mature (my garden is still in it's infancy). I can make out your roof gutter, useful to know how you solved the problem just in case it's an issue I need to address in future. At the moment the water runs off the roof down bark path at the side of greenhouse, which I hope in turn benefits the plants there.
    Although, speaking of the greenhouse, I think I will need to work out how to disguise said greenhouse as it is kind of spoiling the view up to the pond. The trouble is then if I plant taller shrubs I would loose the benefit of the light getting into the greenhouse.

  6. Grower

    Jim Edwards

    I always have my glasshouses in the shade, because I want the humidity but not direct sunlight to burn the foliage and dry the pots out too quick. where I have one in the open I have thrown a shade net over.
    My last glasshouse was shaded by a mock orange with a clematis Montana growing through it.
    Both deciduous so enough light in the winter, the Montana flowers first followed by the fragrant philadelphus, worked really well and only ever needed a trim to keep in shape.


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