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Webbing on surfaces in my garden

  • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
  • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
  • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
  • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
  • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
  • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
  • Webbing on surfaces in my garden

The last couple of weeks I have found white webbing on many types of surfaces in my garden, especially in cracks and crevices, between pots and under shelves and garden furniture. The last few days it seems these webs have almost exploded in amount. I keep removing them when I see them, but the next day I come out in the garden, they are there again, on the same place or in a new place. I have now also started to find them between plants and between the leaves on plants.

After a thorough search on the Internet I must admit I am still not sure what it is I have so I hope I can get help to solve this. Is it spider mites waking up from their winter sleep? Or is it just an unusual amount of spiders, unusually early on? I have tried to look carefully on the webs in my garden, and I can’t see anything moving – and believe me I have really LOOKED. But in some of them there are tiny white or yellow dots, they are completely still. Are they eggs? Of what? Some of the webs are empty, with just debris that has flown past and attached itself to it.

I had an unusually bad infestation of spider mites last summer, when we had the hot, dry weather, and although I got control over it when the weather cooled down, I suppose I might still have lots of offspring lurking around in the garden, waking up about now? But having in mind how wet we have had it lately, it doesn’t really look like spider mite weather to me outside….

I hope my photos can help with identifying what I got, as this is driving me nuts. It is very unsightly, but I am also worried for another infestation of my plants with all the work that involves – and ultimately loss of plants. Apart from all that, I am also worried about passing on any infestations to people I swap plants with so it would be great to get an answer to what’s happening in my garden.

I use an oil based spray for spider mites, if this is spider mites, should I spray EVERYTHING with that, including cracks, crevices, (wooden) fences and containers? If it isn’t spider mites, what should I do to get rid of this?

Thanks for your help.
Helene

Comments (3)

  1. Grower

    Geoff Hodge

    Helene
    These look like spider webs to me. A lot of gardeners are reporting a lot of insect pest activity this year and the spiders may be taking advantage of this.
    Red spider mites are sap suckers, so have to live on plants and won't, as far as I'm aware, move away from them. Also their webs are much finer than those you've shown.
    Hope that helps.
    Geoff

  2. Grower

    Angie's Garden

    Helene, I agree with Geoff. They are likley to be common garden spiders. They'll be doing your garden more good than harm. More than likely the very mild winter will not have seen some of them of as they normally would.

    I thought you might like to see these pictures. I once disturbed a web, not to destroy but I knocked into it. Watching those tiny baby spiders was amazing.
    They spread quite far and within in minutes some of them started to regroup. Obviously safety in numbers.
    To give you an idea of scale the width of the trellis straps are around 1 inch.

    • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
    • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
    • Webbing on surfaces in my garden
  3. Grower

    Helene U Taylor

    Thanks Geoff and Angie, great to know I don’t have to worry about my plants then – I was most worried about passing on any infestations to people I swap and sell plants to.
    I must admit I can’t really see much more spiders in my garden than I usually have, the population normally explode in September but at this time of year it is just the one off here and there.

    I have last summer’s horrible spider mite attack still fresh in mind and would not like to have a repeat of that, it was unusually bad and although many of the plants survived and looked fine – once they had produced new leaves, some of the younger plants died. It was a 6 weeks daily battle to get through and I hope I never have to experience it again. It has made me more wary of possible early signs of pests and diseases I suppose.

    Thanks for showing the spider photos Angie, I am part fascinated and part uneasy by spiders and I hate having them in the house, but are happy to let them go about their business in the garden. I have lots of photos of really close-ups of the spiders I usually get in the autumn, but I know there are lots more types, and many smaller ones. I have no idea which one’s making the webbing, never caught anyone doing it yet. Maybe it’s a nocturnal type of spiders… :-)


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