To buy, sell and swap plants and use our full service, please log in or sign up - it's completely free.

Hostas

  • Hostas
  • Hostas

For all my Hosta fans out there, a couple of photographs of my Hosta tunnels, one from this morning, one from last week. And a reminder that when in garden centres watch out for viruses on imported plants, as usual I have seen a lot about this year, they are not treatable (accept with glyphosphate!), will kill the plant in the end and can be highly infectious.

Comments (4)

  1. Grower

    Amanda CW

    Wow, they look good ... and not a slug or snail in sight! That's always been the challenge for me with Hostas. Is there a decent organic way to keep them at bay? I've heard nematodes work well.

  2. Grower

    Stafford Lake Nursery

    Amanda, current thinking is garlic. Either boiling some cloves up to make a 'cordial', then diluting it in a can and watering the plants, or using the animal feed supplement pellets which can be bought in bulk. I'm also thinking that the high sulphur content of garlic might make it a useful organic fungicide, but that was something that only occurred to me this morning. I use metaldehyde pellets in the tunnels, simply because it is the only commercially viable option, but my stock drifts outside are left to their own devices, and often aren't too badly eaten.

  3. Grower

    Amanda CW

    Oh I like the idea of garlic! The battle of the Hostas can now be a battle of good and evil, driving away slimy evil spirits!

  4. Grower

    Stafford Lake Nursery

    I don't really mind the molluscs, they are just doing their thing. There are all sorts of others ways to do battle with them in the garden. Copper tape, rough substrates, reducing hiding places for them, going out with a torch at night and collecting them, nematodes, encouraging things that eat them. It is a multi pronged attack. Many serious collectors have tunnels, net or poly, to protect them in, or keep their most valued plants in containers.


Production v5.2.0 (7ac6854)